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The Fighting Side of Me: Overcoming Tyranny & Multiculturalism

September 27, 2011

Richard Warman

Paul Fromm:

  • Wonders at the snooping and luggage damage caused by the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) now that Bin Laden is dead;
  • Details Richard Warman’s decade long attack on Internet dissidents — whom he calls “neo-Nazis” — in Canada;
  • Marvels at a dog-eating festival in China — 10,000 to be stabbed, strangled and boiled alive — and the absurdity of multiculturalism;
  • Denounces Obama’s education department for pressuring Arizona to abandon its English language quality monitoring;
  • Exposes Canadian government hypocrisy for denouncing Saudi efforts to quash ads critical of U.S dependance on Saudi oil.

13 MB / 32 kbps mono / 0 hour 57 min.

Contact Paul:
paul@paulfromm.com

Jamie Kelso: The Anti-White Immigration Invasion

September 27, 2011

Dees art - Mexicans running across US border

Jamie Kelso’s September 27, 2011 radio show takes an article from the July 1992 Instauration magazine on the anti-White immigration invasion as its starting point.

13 MB / 32 kbps mono / 0 hour 57 min.

Contact Jamie:
24.7keyboard@gmail.com

A Multipolar World? China’s Role in Central Asia (2011)

September 27, 2011

By Matt Johnson

Shanghai Cooperation Organization leaders

The Shanghai Cooperation organization is China’s weapon in Central Asia, one of the world’s most strategic regions. Her goal is to build a political and economic bloc to challenge the West.

As Marxism fled the Soviet Union, Central Asia became the next set of partially developed states to be sought by the major powers. Central Asia remains significant due to its oil and natural gas reserves, and, just as important, the pipelines from Russia and Iran crossing the area, dumping out in China to the east and the Syrian port cities in the west. Whoever controls this region will become one of the globe’s energy brokers. System-instigated riots in Syria have to do with a) eliminating Israel’s primary local enemy, armed by the Russians and b) take the important, Russian outfitted port cities such as Lattakia.

The Syrian port cities are some of the most significant elements in that economy and connect the Syrian economy to the Iranian and other states in Central Asia. Not only are these of immense strategic importance, but they are also ultra-modern due to Russian investment in its infrastructure. Israel began to publicly worry in the early 1990s as Russo-Syrian scientific and industrial teams discovered more and more sources of petroleum in this country once thought to be almost totally devoid of oil. The state run Syrian oil firms operate three major transport hubs, two on the Mediterranean and one at Lattakia. When Syria began supplying oil and gas to Lebanon, hence solidifying her importance over that strategic country, Israel responded with threats, and eventually, the creation of riots and “civic protests.” Since the Syrian transport hubs and oil firms were state owned, System economists in the US began speaking of the “building of civil society” in Syria. As the industry of Syria grew, Bashar al-Assad went from “reformer” to “tyrant” almost overnight.

One would think that these facts, while significant in themselves, would have nothing to do with China or Central Asia. But these are central facts for the creation of a new trading bloc. The US never made “war” on the USSR. Most Soviet electricity, oil production and electronics were supplied by the US and NATO during the “Cold War.” The US only got upset when the Soviets threatened to create a new bloc of trade run by her, and not the US and her banks. Separating China from the USSR was quickly considered an important priority during the Eisenhower administration and after. The US sought to build up China to use as a counterweight against any threat of an alternative, non-US controlled trading bloc. Throughout this period of the “Cold War,” US-USSR-China trade reached trillions of dollars. Soon, the US sponsored China’s introduction to the UN Security Council as Taiwan was reduced to a “rogue state.”

Syria and her important port cities became central for Chinese penetration into Central Asia. This is partially because Syria, Russia, Iran and Kazakhstan were basically allies of the new Chinese empire since the mid 1990s or so, seeing her as a means of helping create the multi-polar world necessary to eliminate American hegemony. Iran, Armenia and Russia have been in the sights of both the American neocon and neolib movements since the end of the “Cold War.” But as of 2011, the Regime sees its worst fears being realized: a manifest alliance of what Bush laughably called the “Axis of Evil,” which refers to those states who a) actually want to control their own economic destiny, b) are enemies of Israel and the US, and are c) non-liberal in their governments.

China crated the “Shanghai Cooperation Organization” in 2001 to institutionalize its role in Central Asia, and has Russia and most Central Asian states as members. Its purpose is to create the conditions for economic and military coordination and cooperation among its signatories and eventually, to create a single large trading bloc. Nothing could have been worse for the elites in industry, banking and oil in the west. A western world, largely bankrupt, is unable to defeat such a coalition militarily, diplomatically or economically. The only option was the media-academia alliance to pour scorn over these states and their tyranny. The west supplied weapons to Azerbaijan against Armenia, stoked civil unrest in Iran and Syria, and, according to NATO, is planning a suicidal military mission against Syria. Recent threats made by Iran against Azerbaijan are largely influenced by the strong Mossad/CIA presence in the former southern regions of the USSR.

Recent leaked documents speak volumes about the creation of an Islamic Central Asia by the CIA. The Turkish as well as Pakistani press reported on CIA activities in Turkey:

Last year, during an immigration court case involving Turkish Islamic Leader, Fetullah Gulen, US prosecutors exposed an illegal, covert, CIA operation involving the intentional Islamization of Central Asia. This operation has been ongoing since the fall of the Soviet Union in an ongoing Cold War to control the vast energy resources of the region – Uzbekistan, Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan and Turkmenistan – estimated to be worth $3 trillion.

Recent Russian intelligence documents also say the same. In fact, a Pakistani newspaper said this recently about the situation:

FSB head Nikolay Patrushev has mentioned the names of these companies and foundations, saying, ‘The brotherhood engages in anti-Russian activities via two companies, Serhad and Eflak, as well as foundations such as Toros, Tolerans and Ufuk.’ Patrushev has accused the brotherhood of conducting pan-Turkish propaganda, of trying to convert Russian youths to Islam by sowing the seeds of enmity, and of engaging in certain lobbying activities. These companies and foundations have turned up in the internet site of Fethullah Gulen, alleged leader of the Nurcu religious community currently living in the United States who is a defendant in several court cases in Turkey, accused of engaging in anti-secularist activities.

It is reasonable to suppose that this money is being aimed at China as much as Russia.

Both the Chinese and the Russians are active in the region, but Russia has the upper hand due to the fact that the Central Asian states were at one time a part of the Soviet Union. Political science professor Chien-peng Chung writes that the Chinese government seeks influence, if not control, in this region to battle the “three evils” of international politics: fundamentalism, separatism and terror. Given the large Islamic populations of these areas, such fears are not entirely unjustified.

Former FBI translator Sybel Edmunds recent stated to a reporter:

Given the history, and the distrust of the West, the US realized that it couldn’t get direct control, and therefore would need to use a proxy to gain control quickly and effectively. Turkey was the perfect proxy; a NATO ally and a puppet regime. Turkey shares the same heritage/race as the entire population of Central Asia, the same language (Turkic), the same religion (Sunni Islam), and of course, the strategic location and proximity.

This started more than a decade-long illegal, covert operation in Central Asia by a small group in the US intent on furthering the oil industry and the Military Industrial Complex, using Turkish operatives, Saudi partners and Pakistani allies, furthering this objective in the name of Islam.

At the same time, the Chinese are very concerned about terror attacks in the west of the country, a part of China that is largely Islamic and underdeveloped. The Chinese government has regularly accused terror groups of coming into the country from Central Asia with a separatist agenda. The Chinese, according to Chien-peng Chung, are primarily concerned with a pan-Turkish nationalist movement that seeks a unified Central Asian superstate at the expense of Chinese territory and security. NATO, needless to say, lies at the root of this movement. Turkey is a NATO member, and separatist groups in western China have been on the CIA payroll for many decades.

Contributor to the journal Global Research, Andrew G. Marshall, writes the following in 2008 on the Anglo-American obsession with destabilizing the Middle East and Central Asia as the last-ditch attempt to save the eternally bankrupt West:

One of the main targets in this project is Iran, for which the US and Britain have engaged in massive acts of terror and orchestrating large battles and conflicts from within the already-failed state of Iraq. The Anglo-American role as terrorist supporters and as covertly orchestrating terror attacks within Iraq is amply documented. To imagine that these same Anglo-American intelligence and covert networks are not using their long-time conduit, the ISI, for the same purposes in Central Asia, is a stretch of the imagination and logic. It is not merely the Middle East that is the target, but Central Asia, specifically for its geographical relationship to the rising giants such as India and China. This also follows in line with Anglo-American strategies in destabilizing the Central European region, specifically the former Yugoslavia, and more recently, Georgia, largely in an effort to target Russia.

For their part, the Central Asian states seek their own interests. Uzbekistan loves the idea that two major powers are jockeying for position in the area, and seeks to balance the competing powers in the region in good Realist fashion. The United States also seeks influence in the region for the sake of “combating terrorism.” The Chinese see this as merely an excuse for intervention to control the transportation of oil and gas. To a great extent, both Russia and China would like to keep the United States out of the region permanently. The result has been strings of “color revolutions” backed by CIA money and, due to budget constraints, the contributions of Soros and company.

What worries the United States is an alliance among Russia, China and Iran. Not only would a formal alliance be immensely powerful, but very large territorially and potentially very wealthy. Such an alliance could, for better or worse, destroy American influence in the region and create an alternative oil producing and transport organization that could use its power against the west.

Ultimately, both China and Russia seek a Central Asia that they can at least influence, for the minimal project of keeping the Americans out. The creation of a “multipolar” world, where regional hegemons, rather than a single powerful economy, can exercise governance and influence in the worlds regions.

References:

Chung, Chien-peng. (2004) “The Shanghai Co-Operation Organization: China’s Changing Influence in Central Asia.” The China Quarterly, 2004: 989-1009

Marshall, Andrew Gavin (September 2008) “Political Destabilization in South and Central Asia: The Role of the CIA-ISI Terror Network.” Global Research

Kucera, Joshua (January 2011) “Is the CIA Infiltrating Central Asia Via Turkish Muslims?” EurasiaNet.

Edmunds, Sybel (2009) “Illegal CIA Operations Using Islam and Madrassas.” National Security Whistleblower Coalition.

Immigration: The Reserve Army of Capital

September 27, 2011

By Alain de Benoist

Translated from the French by Tom Sunic

North African immigrants arriving at Lampedusa

Immigrants from North Africa arriving daily on the Italian island of Lampedusa

In 1973, shortly before his death, the French President Georges Pompidou admitted to have opened the floodgates of immigration, at a request of a number of big businessmen, such as Francis Bouygues, who was eager to take advantage of docile and cheap labor devoid of class consciousness and of any tradition of social struggle. This move was meant to exert downward pressure on the wages of French workers, reduce their protesting zeal, and in addition, break up the unity of the labor movement. Big bosses, he said, “always want more.”

Forty years later nothing has changed. At a time when no political party would dare to ask for further acceleration of the pace of immigration, only big employers seem to be in favor of it — simply because it is in their interest. The only difference is that the affected economic sectors are now more numerous, going beyond the industrial sector and the hotel and catering service sector — now to include once “protected” professions, such as engineers and computer scientists.

France, as we know, starting with the 19th century, massively reached out to foreign immigrants. The immigrating population was already 800,000 in 1876, only to reach 1.2 million in 1911. French industry was the prime center of attraction for Italian and Belgian immigrants, followed by Polish, Spanish and Portuguese immigrants. “Such immigration, unskilled and non-unionized, allowed employers to evade increasing requirements pertaining to the labor law” (François-Laurent Balssa, « Un choix salarial pour les grandes entreprises » Le Spectacle du monde, Octobre, 2010).

In 1924, at the initiative of the Committee for Coalmining and big farmers from the Northeast of France, a “general agency for immigration” (Société générale d’immigration) was founded. It opened up employment bureaus in Europe, which operated as suction pumps. In 1931 there were 2.7 million foreigners in France, that is, 6.6 % of the total population. At that time France displayed the highest level of immigration in the world (515 persons on 100,000 inhabitants). “This was a handy way for a large number of big employers to exert downward pressure on wages. … From then on capitalism entered the competition of the workforce by reaching out to the reserve armies of wage earners.”

In the aftermath of World War II, immigrants began to arrive more and more frequently from Maghreb countries; first from Algeria, then from Morocco. Trucks chartered by large companies (especially in the automobile and construction industry) came by the hundreds to recruit immigrants on the spot. From 1962 to 1974, nearly two million additional immigrants arrived to France of whom 550,000 were recruited by the National Immigration Service (ONI), a state-run agency, yet controlled under the table by big business. Since then, the wave has continued to grow. François-Laurent Balssa notes that

when a workforce shortage in one sector occurs, out of the two possible choices one must either raise the salary, or one must reach out to foreign labor. Usually it was the latter option that was favored by the National Council of French Employers (CNPF) and as of 1998 by its successor, the Movement of Enterprises (MEDEF). That choice, which bears witness of the desire for short-term benefits, delayed advancement of production tools and industrial innovation. During the same period, however, as the example of Japan demonstrates, the rejection of foreign immigration and favoring of the domestic workforce enabled Japan to achieve its technological revolution, well ahead of most of its Western competitors.

Big Business and the Left; A Holy Alliance

At the beginning, immigration was a phenomenon linked to big business. It still continues to be that way. Those who clamor for always more immigration are big companies. This immigration is in accordance with the very spirit of capitalism, which aims at the erasure of borders (« laissez faire, laissez passer »). “While obeying the logic of social dumping, Balssa continues, a “low cost” labor market has thus been created with the “undocumented” and the “low-skilled,” functioning as stopgap “jack of all trades.” Thus, big business has reached its hand to the far-left, the former aiming at dismantling of the welfare state, considered to be too costly, the latter killing off the nation-state considered to be too archaic.” This is the reason why the French Communist Part (PCF) and the French Trade Union (CGT) (which have radically changed since then) had, until 1981, battled against the liberal principle of open borders, in the name of the defense of the working class interests.

For once a well-inspired Catholic liberal-conservative Philippe Nemo, only confirms these observations:

In Europe there are people in charge of the economy who dream about bringing to Europe cheap labor. Firstly, to do jobs for which the local workforce is in short supply; secondly, to exert considerable  downward pressure on the wages of other workers in Europe. These lobbies, which possess all necessary means to be listened to either by their governments or by the Commission in Brussels, are, generally speaking, both in favor of immigration and Europe’s enlargement — which would considerably facilitate labor migrations. They are right from their point of view — a view of a purely economic logic [...] The problem, however, is that one cannot reason about this matter in economic terms only, given that the inflow of the extra-Europe population has also severe sociological consequences. If these capitalists pay little attention to this problem, it is perhaps because they enjoy, by and large, economic benefits from immigration without however themselves suffering from its social setbacks. With the money earned by their companies, whose profitability is ensured in this manner, they can reside in handsome neighborhoods, leaving their less fortunate compatriots to cope on their own with alien population in poor suburban areas. (Philippe Nemo, Le Temps d’y penser, 2010)

According to official figures, immigrants living in regular households account for 5 million people, which was 8% of the French population in 2008. Children of immigrants, who are direct descendants of one or two immigrants, represent 6.5 million people, which is 11% of the population. The number of illegals is estimated to be between 300,000 to 550,000. (Expulsion of illegal immigrants cost 232 million Euros annually, i.e., 12,000 euro per case). For his part, Jean-Paul Gourevitch, estimates the population of foreign origin living in France in 2009 at 7.7 people million (out of which 3.4 million are from the Maghreb and 2.4 million from sub-Saharan Africa), that is, 12.2% of the metropolitan population. In 2006, the immigrating population accounted for 17% of births in France.

France is today experiencing migrant settlements, which is a direct consequence of   the family reunification policy. However, more than ever before immigrants represent the reserve army of capital.

In this sense it is amazing to observe how the networks on behalf of the “undocumented,” run by the far-left (which seems to have discovered in immigrants its “substitute proletariat”) serve the interests of big business. Criminal networks, smugglers of people and goods, big business, “human rights” activists, and under- the-table employers — all of them, by virtue of the global free market, have become cheerleaders for the abolition of frontiers.

For example, it is a revealing fact that Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri in their books Empire and Multitude endorse “world citizenship ” when they call for the removal of borders, which must have as a first goal in developed countries the accelerated settlement of the masses of low-wage Third World workers. The fact that most migrants today owe their displacement to outsourcing, brought about by the endless logic of the global market, and that their displacement is precisely something capitalism strives for in order to fit everybody into the market, and finally, that each territorial attachment could be a part of human motivations — does not bother these two authors at all. On the contrary, they note with satisfaction that “capital itself requires increased mobility of labor as well as continuous migration across national borders.” The world market should constitute, from their point of view, a natural framework for “world citizenship.” The market “requires a smooth space of uncoded and deterritorialized flux,” destined to serve the interests of the “masses”, because “mobility carries a price tag of capital, which means the enhanced desire for liberty.”

The trouble with such an apology of human displacement, seen as a first condition of “liberating nomadism,” is that it relies on a completely unreal outlook of the specific situation of migrants and displaced people. As Jacques Guigou and Jacques  Wajnsztejn write, “Hardt and Negri delude themselves with the capacity of the immigration flows, thought to be a source for new opportunities for capital valuation, as well as the basis for opportunity enhancement for the masses. Yet, migrations signify nothing else but a process of universal competition, whereas migrating has no more emancipating value than staying at home. A “nomadic” person is no more inclined to criticism or to revolt than a sedentary person.”  (L’évanescence de la valeur. Une présentation critique du groupe Krisis, 2004).

“As long as people keep abandoning their families, adds Robert Kurz, and look for work elsewhere, even at the risk of their own lives — only to be ultimately shredded by the treadmill of capitalism — they will be less the heralds of emancipation and more the self-congratulatory agents of the postmodern West.  In fact, they only represent its miserable version.”  (Robert Kurz, « L’Empire et ses théoriciens », 2003).

Whoever criticizes capitalism, while approving immigration, whose working class is its first victim, had better shut up. Whoever criticizes immigration, while remaining silent about capitalism, should do the same.

Alain de Benoist is a philosopher residing in France. The above article was first published in the  quarterly Eléments, “L’immigration; armée de réserve du capital” (April-June 2011, Nr. 139).

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