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The Sunic Journal: Notes from Europe, Lesson Three

March 1, 2011

The coat of arms of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia

Tom Sunic lectures on the history of the Balkans and its main pillar, the ex-Yugoslavia, which lasted from 1919 to 1941. He looks briefly at this bizarre patchwork of different religions, cultures, languages and different ethnic groups and explains why this first monarchic Yugoslavia collapsed.

13 MB / 32 kbps mono / 0 hour 56 min.

Contact Tom:
tom.sunic@hotmail.com

Comments

4 Responses to “The Sunic Journal: Notes from Europe, Lesson Three”

  1. A German on March 7th, 2011 2:33 am

    Thank you Dr. Sunic for these lecture like, private conversation like, broadcasts!
    It is very helpful and knowledge enriching.
    Too often, when you have a guest on, you are in a hush if you want to state something.
    This lecture like broadcast must become a regular.
    perhaps one week a guest, the other week a lecture.

    Hvala puno Dr. Sunic!
    Imajte na borbu!

  2. A German on March 9th, 2011 1:25 pm

    Dr. Sunic I very much appreciated this lecture series.
    I hope you will continue this.
    I have for long time an interest in Yugoslavia.

    And that’s why I ‘ve a question for you:
    What is your opnion? Will there ever be a united Yugolsavia without the umbrella of Tito-Communism?

    When I attended my seminar about “Yugolsavism”, the half Slovenian tutoress told us that there’s now a kind of Yugo-revivalism among young people in all Yugoslavian countries and especially among Croats, Serbs, Bosniaks, Slovenes who live outside of Yugoslavia.

    Do you think that a new Yugoslavia is possible in the future?
    After all, in the next 10-20 years Croatia and Serbia will join the EU and then they will be quasi unified anyways.
    Right now the Serbian politicians even seem to be willing to sell the Kosovo (Kosovo Polje) for an EU membership.

    And as you said “these people are so similar in their phenotype”.
    In my opinion they all share the same genes.
    Perhaps 60% Illyrian, 35% Slavic, and the rest Roman, Greek, Celtic, Germanic influences.
    But at the end they’re all part of the South Slavic people.
    Even if they try to make up different ethnogenesis now.

    Everyone can see that they’re one and it’s a pity that they caused so much atrocities against each other and that they are so devided.

    South of them there are 80 million Turks ready for conquest, which become every year more and more and the Yugoslav peoples only have blood feuds in their heads.
    Really a pity.

    But it was also a great personal achievement of you Dr. Sunic to overcome this tribalism. Especially after the civil war.
    I know that had to be tough for you.

  3. Rob on March 9th, 2011 2:16 pm

    “South of them there are 80 million Turks ready for conquest, which become every year more and more and the Yugoslav peoples only have blood feuds in their heads.Really a pity.”

    This really is disconcerting. The turks believe that the Balkans are still their sphere of influence, and wield the muslim populations there as a 5th column against the Balkan peoples. The role of America has been especially villainous there, in that they have built up Turkey as a NATO member against Russia and consistently support its accession to the EU, and keep promoting the multi-ethnic multi-religious pluralistic model which plays right into Turkey’s hands. Most of the Balkan peoples, outside of the Serbs, seem to have an aversion to the Russians because of their soviet communist past control of the region, but it seems that present realities dictate from a geopolitical and cultural viewpoint, the Balkan peoples would be better served by becoming client states of Russia, rather than the U.S. With Russia as a patron, they have a fighting chance for survival against any possible future encroachments by the turks in that region. But if they continue to depend on the U.S., America will be very happy to abandon them to forced multiculturalization and eventual ethnic extinction.

  4. Hic Est Draco on March 13th, 2011 8:17 pm

    @A German;
    The revival of Yugoslavia is as likely as the revival of ancient Carthage. Serbia will not become an EU member for at least 10 years, if ever. Croatia is just about to join it, next year, unless her people vote themselves out of it. There’s a very distinct possibility that Croatia may be the first country to say no to the EU. Which will be extremely embarrassing for Brussels and may be the beginning of the end for the EU.

    Tom Sunic, with his serbophilia, is very untypical for a Croat. He may in fact be the only person in his country who thinks the way he does. In his speech in Stockholm he refers to his ancestors who fough in the 30-year war on the Catholic (or Imperial) side, as the bad guys. Go figure.

    Croatia’s main enemy currently is England. Serbia is a powerless joke, but still not liked because of the wars. Serbia is also a proxy for England. Croatia in turn is probably Germany’s most loyal client. This has roots in the five centuries of wars agaist the Turks. Russia is out of the question as a direct ally, but trade and other normal exchanges are better between Russia and Croatia than between Russia and Serbia.

    Turkey, despite its NATO equipment and despite its seemingly strong armed forces has no realistic chance of becoming a power in the Balkans. Their client, the muslim Bosniaks, are even more of a joke than the Serbs.

    Looking at racial similarities, or differences, between the various peoples in the Balkans makes no sense. There’s no racial divide a la USA. Therefore, building friendships based on skin color also makes no sense. Remember, all Europeans are white, more or less.

    New times will come and that will forge new alliances. I’m afraid that Americans in general and Right Wingers in particular will miss the train completely.

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